Video: Ken Burns narrates and John McCain featured as ESPN E:60 profiles the Let Teddy Win movement

As usual, Teddy Roosevelt pulled up the rear but stole the show, as  ESPN’s E:60 ended  Tuesday night with an eight minute Ken Burns-narrated feature story on the conspiracy surrounding Nationals racing  president Teddy Roosevelt.

Nationals racing president Teddy Roosevelt ESPNTeddy Roosevelt's great great grandson Winthrop RooseveltJohn McCain with Teddy Roosevelt DollTeddy Roosevelt Presidents Race Abe CheatsESPN’s Michael Johns set out to produce the definitive piece on the Let Teddy Win movement, and by all accounts, a new bar has been set. The mini-documentary featured the Let Teddy Win blog along with interviews with Senator John McCain and the great great grandson of Theodore Roosevelt himself, Winthrop Roosevelt.

“Theodore Roosevelt is one of the great presidents in history,” McCain says in the video. “I’ve been paying a lot of attention to the fact that one of the truly great presidents in history has never won a race. I’m outraged. That’s why I’m calling for congressional hearings to right this horrible wrong.”

The Arizona senator called Teddy’s losing streak “one of the more traumatic experiences I’ve had as I watch my hero, my childhood idol, being treated in such a cavalier fashion.”

“He is Mount Rushmore’s Rodney Dangerfield,” Burns intones has he describes Teddy’s lot in modern day Washington, “a legendary president that gets no respect.”

Moments after the feature aired on ESPN, it had already inspired a “Make Teddy Win” charity campaign.

Video: The Post Profiles some seriously insane Nats fan

When The Washington Post asked me to stay mic’d up during yesterday’s game, I wasn’t sure what to expect.

Here it is. The Post released the companion video to presidential speechwriter Paul Orzulak’s must-read opinion piece on the Let Teddy Win movement, and well, the video speaks for itself.

I am amazed by how quickly producer Brad Horn pieced this together.

Thomas Jefferson collides with Abe Lincoln at the finish

One night after Washington Nationals fans cheered Teddy Roosevelt to victory, then saw him disqualified, our favorite #26 returned to form, trailing early and failing to finish the presidents race.

It was nonetheless one of the more exciting finishes of the ’09 season. Abe Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson battled to the finish line, with Tom diving at the tape and Abe collapsing on top of him.

STANDINGS NOTE: The Nationals Park presidents race standings remained unchanged from the night before, suggesting that Abe was not credited with last night’s victory after Teddy’s disqualification.

Video by YouTube member lfahome

Video from Monday’s presidents race on ice skates

From YouTube member dcfd3694 comes this terrific video of the Presidents Day presidents race on ice skates at Nassau Coliseum.

[Youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rt1_dkVdV_0]

The chaotic two-lap race featured two knock-downs of Teddy, who scuffled not only with Abe Lincoln but with Thomas Jefferson as well, before cheating and cutting across the ice. You have to give credit to Teddy. Despite falling and fighting, he gave it his all and almost caught George Washington at the finish line.

A great addition to the presidents race videos page to kick off 2009.

Presidents Race Video: Extra Innings Yawner

From YouTube member Swirlywand comes this video of Friday night’s extra-innings presidents race in which the few fans who were still at Nationals Park at midnight watched Abe, Tom, and Teddy give up and turn around before the race was half-way through.

New video of Tuesday’s presidents race takedown

Thanks to Vimeo member tigerlilies for capturing great video of Tuesday night’s melee between the racing presidents at Nationals Park (video added to the presidents race videos page).

Video: Pirates’ Pierogies vs. Nationals’ Presidents

Thanks to psugradgirl for uploading this video of Tuesday night’s race from Pittsburgh’s PNC Park, when the Pirates’ racing pierogies, led by anchor runner Jalapeno Hanna, won a relay race vs. the visiting Washington Nationals’ racing presidents. Unfortunately, the change of venue did nothing to inspire Teddy Roosevelt, who ran the anchor leg and blew the presidents’ big lead.

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