Video: Teddy runs out stadium door, loses presidents race

Nationals Presidents Race Runs Backwards Teddy Tom wins 1Nationals Presidents Race Runs Backwards Teddy Tom wins 1Nationals Presidents Race Runs Backwards Teddy Tom wins 1

Teddy Roosevelt took a lead into the home stretch of Thursday’s presidents race at Nationals Park, but ran off the field through an open gate, giving Thomas Jefferson the win.

The Nationals’ presidents race ran in a novel route Thursday afternoon, starting in left field foul territory, and racing for the first time ever towards a finish line placed in center field.

Fans cheered as Teddy Roosevelt jumped out to a early lead, and after Calvin Coolidge face-planted on the warning track, only Thomas Jefferson posed a threat to the Rough Rider.

But the usual center field starting gate was open, and Teddy inexplicably ran right through it and out of the stadium, leaving the field to Jefferson.

3 videos today: First, the full in-stadium race video follows as called by Jerome Hruska, followed by a nifty on-field view of the finish from @Teddy26Nats, and finally as called on TV.

Enjoy:

Video: Teddy Roosevelt turns Abe Lincoln into a giant Chia Pet

Chia Pet Nats presidents race Teddy Roosevelt magicianChia Pet Abe Lincoln Nats presidents race Teddy magicianOver 37,500 fans were on hand Wednesday night for Jayson Werth Chia Pet night at Nationals Park, and as is often the case for such special promotions, the racing presidents joined in on the fun.

Before the start of the fourth inning presidents race, Teddy Roosevelt appeared along the outfield warning track, wearing a magician’s outfit, complete with cape, top hat and wand.

The race began with only Washington, Jefferson, Taft, and Coolidge, who were stopped by mid-race by the conjurer Teddy.

The Wizard of San Juan Hill then turned and pointed his wand at the bullpen gate, where he “conjured” a giant Chia Pet, aka Abe Lincoln, whose beard shed a stream of chia leaves as he dashed for the finish line.

No finish line video today, but here’s the race as it was called in-stadium by Nats PA announcer Jerome Hruska:

Video: MASN calls it for Abe Lincoln but Teddy Roosevelt sneaks away with the win

The Nationals’ racing presidents opened a homestand Monday night at Nationals Park with a fourth inning brawl-fest, as Calvin Coolidge shoved William Howard Taft, then got rammed himself by George Washington before they even reached the right field bullpen.

Teddy wins or Abe wins - Bad Call NationalsThe pushing and shoving extended to the home stretch, where Teddy Roosevelt pulled away, then turned to fall backwards over the finish line, only to be caught by Abraham Lincoln — or so it seemed.

MASN broadcaster Bob Carpenter, calling the race on the Nats’ broadcast, proclaimed what many in the stands thought they saw: Abe Lincoln claiming his 15th victory of the season; but the win was handed to Roosevelt.

Carpenter later corrected himself. “They’re saying it might have been Teddy by a spectacle in a photo finish.”

Fans plan public chicken sacrifice for 5:00pm Tuesday at Nationals Park

Fans showing up to Nationals Park two hours before first pitch Tuesday night will get a little extra for their money.

Washington Nationals Rubber Chicken Man Hugh Kaufman displays his Chicken Mode T-ShirtHugh Kaufman, aka the Nationals’ “Rubber Chicken Man,” will be leading a group of fans through the Kaporos ritual outside the centerfield gate, sacrificing a rubber chicken to “ward off the bad juju” that has fallen on the team as they’ve lost four straight to fall out of first place in the National League East.

Longtime readers are familiar with the ritual, most recently performed at the ball park after the Nationals lost the first two games of the 2014 divisional playoffs. Remarkably, it seems to usually work. The team went on to win game three. Kaufman’s sacrifices have preceded winning streaks almost annually since 2005, and have been called on by previous manager Davey Johnson, and by pitcher Gio Gonzalez, who has been known to wear a “Chicken Mode” t-shirt in honor of Kaufman.

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