Orzulak calls for Teddy to win on August 18

If presidential speechwriter Paul Orzulak gets his way, Teddy Roosevelt will win the Nationals’ 500th presidents race on August 18.

Washington Nationals' Teddy RooseveltIn an opus for the Washington Post opinion pages entitled “Seriously, Nats: It’s time for Teddy to win,” Orzulak presents the most thorough and cogent case yet for the Washington Nationals to finally let Teddy win.

“In the long history of organized sports, no team or individual at the collegiate or professional level has ever lost 500 times in a row,” Orzulak writes.

But that is, in fact, the fate that awaits Teddy on August 18, rainouts or extra overtime races notwithstanding.

“Teddy winning wouldn’t just make sense for the 2012 Nats — it could even boost the national mood,” Orzulak writes, laying out a meticulous list of president Roosevelt’s qualifications and of the injustices handed his 2012 counterpart.

It’s today’s must read. Video report to follow.

Video: Racing presidents perform rhythmic gymnastics in Olympic tribute

Nationals racing presidents Olympic rhythmic gymnastics Teddy gets airNationals racing presidents Olympic rhythmic gymnasticsNationals racing presidents Olympic rhythmic gymnastics George Washington posesIf you’ve ever wondered what rhythmic gymnastics would look like if Olympic athletes had to wear 10 foot high, 45 pound costumes, the answer arrived with gusto Thursday night at Nationals Park.

After race walking and fencing through the first two matches of the series, the Rushmore Four continued to push the envelope with their week of Olympic tributes, entering the field carrying ribbons and performing a presidential rendition of rhythmic gymnastics.

“Good form and execution by George,” intoned Nationals P.A. announcer Jerome Hruska. “Wonderful control of the apparatus by Teddy.”

The presidents then paused in front of the visitors bullpen for invidual displays. “That’s a 10 for George,” Hruska continued as Washington twirled from the ground. Teddy received “a slight deduction,” but the reasons weren’t clear.

The presidents then took off towards the finish line, but Teddy, Abe, and Tom got tangled up in ribbons, and George Washington leapt to victory.

“George gets the gold,” added Nationals broadcaster Bob Carpenter
on the MASN broadcast. “My greatest challenge as the Nationals TV announcer doing play by play is making sense of the presidents race,” he added. “Baseball is a simple game compared to that.”

Video courtesy of YouTube member lfahome

Racing presidents take up swords in Olympic fencing tribute

Racing presidents Olympic fencing with swords Teddy v Abe LincolnRacing presidents Olympic fencing with swords Teddy v GeorgeRacing presidents Olympic fencing with swords Teddy v TomThe Nationals racing presidents continued their week of Olympic tributes on Wednesday night at Nationals Park with a rare non-race event — fencing.

Teddy Roosevelt emerged from the centerfield gate bearing a foil, a flexible sword used in Olympic competitions. With Abe Lincoln waiting to confront Teddy on the warning track, the two crossed swords, but Teddy knocked Lincoln’s foil into the air, and ran past.

George Washington was next, and Roosevelt quickly dispatched him with a thrust move that sent the Founding Father to the ground.

Teddy took off, but Thomas Jefferson was waiting for him at the finish line, standing motionless and blocking his path with a sabre. Roosevelt advanced and swung at Jefferson, but Teddy’s foil shattered against Tom’s much stiffer sword.

Jefferson lunged at the defenseless Bull Moose to score the victory. Teddy collapsed to the ground, and Jefferson walked across the finish line.

Here’s the finish line video, followed by the call by Bob Carpenter on MASN, with some good close-ups of Lincoln’s parry.

Finish lideo courtesy of YouTube member lfahome

Nationals Racing presidents kick off a week of Olympic races

Nationals racing presidents Olympic race walkingNationals racing presidents Olympic race walking Teddy Roosevelt LosesThe Washington Nationals racing presidents opened a six game home stand at Nationals Park promising to dedicate all races this week to events of the Olympic Games.

The festivities kicked off Tuesday night with a “race walk” at Nationals Park set to Olympic music (yes, race walking is in fact an Olympic event).

George Washington led a tight pack into the right field corner, but the pace picked up in the home stretch, and Thomas Jefferson broke into a moderate sprint.

George and Abe gave chase, leaving Teddy Roosevelt as the only president to stick to the rules.

Video courtesy of YouTube member lfahome

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